St. Stephens Indian School
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Our goal is to keep St. Stephens Indian School families up to date on the important issues affecting our schools. We also want to share all the wonderful things that happen to make SSIS a great place to get an education.

Parent Volunteers

“The ultimate expression of generosity is not in giving of what you have, but in giving of who you are.”
~Johnnetta B. Cole

It is tough for working parents to cram volunteer work into an already packed schedule. While volunteering used to be just a nice way to get to know your child’s teacher and classmates, now it has become a lot more. Schools need parent volunteers more than ever, as they play a growing role in saving programs and staff that generate enough cash to help salvage them. Having adults and parents present at school goes way beyond raising money for extracurricular activities and after-school programs; it also helps children develop into healthy, confident adults. 

Some schools manage to turn out successful students despite a lack of resources.  Community and parent support is one big reason. Even at schools with only one teacher and a handful of children, the presence of parents and neighbors not only enriches the teaching but helps kids develop self-esteem and the ability to form strong relationships with adults.

Volunteers’ growing role in education raises the discussion that all parents should try to figure out a way to contribute. There are a myriad of ways to do so: field trips, parties, working in the school’s copy center or library, helping with the teacher’s paperwork at home, reading or math tutoring in the classroom or in an “after-school program” are just a few.

Take advantage of various volunteer opportunities for and with your children. Below are more resources to get the creative juices flowing:

Encourage Healthy Drink Choices

As parents and caregivers alike, we are often faced with hard decisions regarding what to give our children - to help hydrate them and to keep them healthy. With many sports and juice drinks on the market today, the choices can be overwhelming at times.

Popular kids’ drinks advertise anything from added vitamin C and vitamin D to added antioxidants. The brightly colored juice boxes and packages display our kids’ favorite cartoon character or sports figure enticing them to pick the fun and exciting drink as opposed to the healthier more ‘boring’ options of 100% fruit juice, milk, and water.

Although healthier than other alternatives such as soda and other popular drinks, fruit juices and other sports drinks also contain a high amount of sugar. Is it wrong to let your child indulge in one of these drinks from time to time? Probably not, but on a regular basis these drinks affect the overall health of the child.

According to Anne Kolker, a registered dietician, sport drinks have as much as 13 teaspoons of added sugar. It is important to look at the serving size on the nutrition label. The label might read that a beverage bottle contains 80 calories, however, it is important to double check the label. For example, if the serving size states 2.5 servings, you must figure out the math. In this case, the 80-calorie beverage contains 200 calories. Not all fruit juice is created equal. Most do provide 100% juice, but be careful of how it is marketed. Some juice drinks may look like regular juice and advertise 100% vitamin C; however one of the main ingredients is high fructose corn syrup.

How can we encourage our children to make healthier drink choices? We can make water, juice, and milk fun and exciting. Water is more tempting when it is chilled and has some fruit added to it. Juice is a favorite and can be frozen to make ice pops. Milk can be added to your child’s favorite healthy cereal or mixed with fruit or light chocolate syrup.

As parents, the best way to help our children make healthier drink choices is to set a good example by making healthier drink choices ourselves.